Francesco Attanasio

  

CSM, Ericsson

Location: Salerno, Italy


Certifications

Certified ScrumMaster

Groups I belong to

Lean Agile@Italy

Biography

Francesco Attanasio is a Professional ScrumMaster, CSM, Developer, Trainer, Reader, Dreamer and Runner.

Holding a Master’s degree in Computer Science from Salerno University, he started working in Ericsson as Software Developer in 1996, after one year as Information Technology and Programming Languages Trainer.

After several years’ experience in SW Development, System Management and Technical Coordination of international and complex telecom/IT projects, with external partners and suppliers, he started embracing Scrum. He's now been working as Scrum Master for more than 2 years. Having worked so far as Scrum Developer and Scrum Master in several teams, Francesco has fieldwork experience of how Scrum can be implemented with success.

He provides Agile/Scrum training and coaching to Product Owners, ScrumMasters and Development Teams.

Articles I've written

Coaching Scrum Teams Through Conflict Navigation and Effective Communication Strategies
In my previous experience as a technical coordinator, before embracing Scrum, I didn't have to go into the face of conflict very often, because team members in conflict had to deal with their issues by escalating them to their managers. I've realized that what ScrumMasters need is a "conflict management workout": a number of simple practices to keep in mind when trying to navigate conflict effectively. . . .

CREATE New Thinking with One-on-One Coaching
Sooner or later comes a time to coach people one-on-one. . . . In my experience as a ScrumMaster, when it happened for the first time, I wasn't ready.

ScrumMastering by Clarity of Distance
In my experience as ScrumMaster, I'm learning  that the less I'm involved in details and technical tasks, like a team member, the better able I am to see what is really going on in the team dynamics and how to navigate the conflicts. . . .

Playing the ScrumMaster Role
Many organizations that embark on the journey to achieve greater agility are soon confused by who ought to play the role of the ScrumMaster, and by the nature of that role. Maybe this sounds familiar. . . .

Follow up with FEELING
Making sure an action is done is only a small part of the value of the follow-up process. The big reason to follow up after creating new thinking is to support the creation of new long-term habits that will improve people's performance. . . . One way we can do this is to use the FEELING model.

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