Where Those Who Sprint Go The Extra Mile
 » AgileCareers » CareersBlog » September 2016 » Advice to New Graduates

Advice to New Graduates

21 September 2016


by: Quantix

First, congratulations on the completion and welcome to the start of your career. You've put effort into studying for this next phase. Now, it’s time to apply that well-earned knowledge.
 

There are many paths your career can take from this starting point, and most are not visible from the starting line. For the last 30 years the trend has been for people to change jobs every three to four years, especially in the early stages after graduation. This has as much to do with accelerated change in the economy as it does with personal motivation. Being able to accept and adapt to change will be important in determining whether you are satisfied and happy with the journey or not.

 

As one of the 12 principles of Agile is to harness change for competitive advantage, consider applying the method to your career.

Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable products.

Be an altruistic team member and deliver value to the team. Team members who are all about themselves avoid the grunt work whenever possible, passing it off to other team members. They are more interested in proving their technical prowess than delivering value to customers. The people around them may respect their technical abilities, but they are not well liked and don’t end up in fulfilling roles.

Volunteer for the more mundane assignments, help your teammates whenever you can, and focus on the success of the project. You may get taken advantage of once in a while, but your teammates and supervisors will like you. As a result, you will develop a solid network that will enable you to move between teams and companies without difficulty. Opportunity and good money almost always follow.

Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.

Chase the opportunity, not the money, when considering change. Being solely motivated by money and always looking for the next position that pays more, makes a person appear to have a minimal amount of loyalty to employers or anyone else. They often burn bridges and end up both unsatisfied and unhappy.

Alternatively, being the best you can be within your area of expertise means that you are not selfish in choosing positions based on the opportunity. Think about whether the position well help you to grow. Money is important, but you should also be willing to show that it is not your sole focus. Be willing to take a pay cut for the right opportunity – an opportunity that helps you refine a skill or add a new skill. This will help you build alliances, make a positive name for yourself, and generally appear to be happy. In the end you won’t need to chase the money, it will chase you.

Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.

Enjoy yourself and the work you are doing. People who really don’t like what they’re doing may make a ton of money, but they’re miserable. They are toxic to the people around them and toxic to themselves.

Be the person who enjoys their work. Let go of the competitive points like the highest pay or longer hours and focus on work that fits you and your personality. You will be happier and people will like to be around you. You can be the person who lifts up those around you and, by doing so, lift up yourself.

At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

Take the time to check in with yourself and those close to you. Make sure that your current career path is working for you. People who let their career happen to them often wonder how they got to the place in their life where they have limited options or are at a dead end. They didn't take time to make adjustments early enough to create opportunities for themselves by learning a new skill or shifting industries.

Instead, when you reflect on what you have achieved, where you can improve, and where you can adjust, you are more active in creating your career. This includes learning from failures and changing either the circumstance (new employer or role) or how you approach the work you do (new technical or interpersonal skills). There are many opportunities and challenges in a career. Reflecting on how they occur and how you respond will make you more resilient for when the next one arrives.

Congratulations to those graduating from college this year! May you all prosper and be happy!

----

This blog post is based on Advice to Computer Science Grads – Class of 2016. Thank you to Quantix for allowing AgileCareers.com the use of this content.



Article Rating
Current rating: 0 (0 ratings)

Comments
Jonathan Kennerley
https://www.tpg-pc.com/Blog/July-2018/Time-Out
7/20/2019 6:37:49 PM

IBuyEssayOnline.com
Enjoy yourself and the work you are doing. People who really don’t like what they’re doing may make a ton of money, but they’re miserable. They are toxic to the people around them and toxic to themselves.

Be the person who enjoys their work. Let go of the competitive points like the highest pay or longer hours and focus on work that fits you and your personality. You will be happier and people will like to be around you. You can be the person who lifts up those around you and, by doing so, lift up yourself.
6/18/2019 2:46:52 AM

GreenGeeks Discount Codes
I've clear my graduation this year and want some guidance and here this blog really very helpful for graduates for their career. and I would love to suggest you GreenGeeks who is offering best hosting deals and students can create their own blogging sites at low cost which must be helpful for them to know more about technologies.
3/29/2019 7:15:58 AM

sgdd
sgbx
3/29/2019 7:12:30 AM

 Security code

How To Bomb An Interview
Six Critical Questions Candidates Should Ask During an Interview
Agile for Recruiters Part 4
Agile for Recruiters Part 3
Agile for Recruiters Part 2
Agile for Recruiters, Part 1
Meaningful Careers and Growth (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 4)
Interview Preparation – A Little Planning Goes a Long Way
Are Certifications Really Necessary?
Rethinking Reward and Recognition (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 3)
Don’t Sabotage Your Hiring Process
Shifting to Iterative Performance Flow (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 2)
Candidate Brand Management
Gamification of Talent Acquisition (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 1)
In Agile, It’s Not Just Whom You Hire, But When You Hire Them
Q&A Series: Agile Leadership Webinar «Agile HR | People Operations»
Use Agile to Hire Agile - Part 2
Software Development Career Path - The Agilist Perspective
Why Attending an Online Career Fair is a No-Brainer for Employers
How to Write a Great Personal Statement
Use Agile to Hire Agile - Part 1
Five Ways Lean | Agile Enterprises Rock At Onboarding
Advice to New Graduates
First Impressions Count When Hiring Agile Talent
Want to Develop a Strong Talent Pipeline? Four Things to Consider
REAL AGILITY – SELF-ORGANIZING TEAM CREATION EVENT FOR LARGE-SCALE AGILE ENTERPRISES
Six Behaviors to Consider for an Agile Team
The State Of Agile Recruitment
Is an Agile Career Right For You? 7 Unique Qualities of Agile Work
Can the Scrum Master also be the Product Owner?
Agile is not Scrum
TIPS TO START AGILE IN A HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT
What Do You Look for in a Servant Leader or a Scrum Master?
Product Owners and Scrum Masters: Partners in Adversity
Six Behaviors to Consider for an Agile Team
What is Agile Leadership?
Six tips for hiring Agile people with Lena Bednarikova
How to Hire an Agile Coach
Six Tips for Interviewing Scrum Masters, Part 1
Who’s Who in Agile Teams?
Advice for Interviewing Scrum Masters
38 Scrum Master Interview Questions

February 2017(1)
January 2017(4)
December 2016(5)
November 2016(7)
October 2016(4)
September 2016(3)
August 2016(3)
July 2016(2)
June 2016(4)
May 2016 (3)
April 2016(1)
March 2016 (3)
February 2016(2)