Where Those Who Sprint Go The Extra Mile
 » AgileCareers » CareersBlog » June 2016 » Agile is not Scrum

Agile is not Scrum

28 June 2016


by: Adam Myhr 
 

When looking for information on Agile, software development is the most common industry represented. Within those results more often than not Scrum is used as the implementation. Many articles that try to talk about Agile in a generic sense use terminology from Scrum. A common side effect of this is that many people associate Agile and Scrum on a 1 to 1 level. This is a problem.

Agile is flexible.

In learning about Agile I have come to realize that one of the main concepts is that we do not know what we do not know. As we go through a project there will be new information. In being Agile we admit that up front. We start the project when we have the least information needed. We often take breaks to see what we have learned along with what that changes along the way. Most importantly, we allow those changes to occur whether they are to the project or our process.

Scrum is well-defined.

To be considered Scrum there are very specific rules that must be adhered to. If any of them are missing Scrum is not truly taking place. If any of them are in place in name only then at best “Scrum-but” is taking place. The entirety of what is required for Scrum to happen can be condensed into a 16 page guide or a 20 page primer. Nothing more and nothing less is required to be Scrum.

Agile guides decision

.

The heart of Agile is a set of values. Drilling down to the next level of Agile as defined for software development are a set of guiding principles. In none of the values or principles is an edict for activity made. They are all ideals to keep at the forefront of decision-making. They are meant to shape how a project is approached, not dictate the method used for accomplishing work.

Scrum dictates process structure.

The heart of scrum is a set of roles, events, and artifacts. The roles people play on a project team are consolidated to one of three named positions. There are specific meetings that must take place every iteration. Work must be structured and queued in a certain way. Inside of this defined shell is Scrum. Outside of it is something else.

Agile is a way of thinking.

Agile thinking can benefit any project. Agile thinking is also something that can be done in many different working environments. An Emergency Room can be run as an Agile project using a method such as Kanban. Agile thinking is open thinking. Open to change. Open to improvement. Open to modifications. Agile thinking allows for bonds to be as broad as practical.

Scrum is a framework for getting work done.

Scrum is specific to product development, specifically software development. Scrum allows for flexibility, but only inside of the framework. Anything that is outside of the framework is an addition to scrum. It is allowed, but only if it does not undermine the framework itself. Anything removed from the framework means Scrum is no longer happening.

Scrum is Agile but Agile is not Scrum.

Just as all Fords are vehicles but not all vehicles are Fords Scrum is Agile but Agile is not Scrum. Scrum is something that, when used properly, is Agile. It allows for constant, short feedback cycles. It allows for continuous improvement. It gives transparency to the people who need it. Agile allows for more. Agile allows the framework to change as needed to best deliver value to the customer. Agile allows people to be placed in front of defined roles.

Scrum is a good place to start an Agile journey. It is simple on paper and in concept. It is widespread and shows a lot of success over the last decade. It is well understood and the benefits can easily be explained to the organization at large. The structure for Scrum can be mapped out and placed in an organization in a very short time frame. As an Agile Coach I would default to Scrum for most software development environments at the outset. In the end though, Agile needs to be more important than Scrum. Scrum is going to work. It might even be the best solution. Once a team trends towards high-performing the framework of Scrum must not be a limiting factor in improving the product and performance of that team. For this reason, even though I would start as Scrum, as an Agile Coach I would be open Scrum-but over Pure Scrum in more cases than I would be blatantly against it. 

This article was originally posted on Our Agile Journey



Article Rating
Current rating: 0 (0 ratings)

Comments
Blog post currently doesn't have any comments.
 Security code

How To Bomb An Interview
Six Critical Questions Candidates Should Ask During an Interview
Agile for Recruiters Part 4
Agile for Recruiters Part 3
Agile for Recruiters Part 2
Agile for Recruiters, Part 1
Meaningful Careers and Growth (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 4)
Interview Preparation – A Little Planning Goes a Long Way
Are Certifications Really Necessary?
Rethinking Reward and Recognition (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 3)
Don’t Sabotage Your Hiring Process
Shifting to Iterative Performance Flow (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 2)
Candidate Brand Management
Gamification of Talent Acquisition (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 1)
In Agile, It’s Not Just Whom You Hire, But When You Hire Them
Q&A Series: Agile Leadership Webinar «Agile HR | People Operations»
Use Agile to Hire Agile - Part 2
Software Development Career Path - The Agilist Perspective
Why Attending an Online Career Fair is a No-Brainer for Employers
How to Write a Great Personal Statement
Use Agile to Hire Agile - Part 1
Five Ways Lean | Agile Enterprises Rock At Onboarding
Advice to New Graduates
First Impressions Count When Hiring Agile Talent
Want to Develop a Strong Talent Pipeline? Four Things to Consider
REAL AGILITY – SELF-ORGANIZING TEAM CREATION EVENT FOR LARGE-SCALE AGILE ENTERPRISES
Six Behaviors to Consider for an Agile Team
The State Of Agile Recruitment
Is an Agile Career Right For You? 7 Unique Qualities of Agile Work
Can the Scrum Master also be the Product Owner?
Agile is not Scrum
TIPS TO START AGILE IN A HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT
What Do You Look for in a Servant Leader or a Scrum Master?
Product Owners and Scrum Masters: Partners in Adversity
Six Behaviors to Consider for an Agile Team
What is Agile Leadership?
Six tips for hiring Agile people with Lena Bednarikova
How to Hire an Agile Coach
Six Tips for Interviewing Scrum Masters, Part 1
Who’s Who in Agile Teams?
Advice for Interviewing Scrum Masters
38 Scrum Master Interview Questions

February 2017(1)
January 2017(4)
December 2016(5)
November 2016(7)
October 2016(4)
September 2016(3)
August 2016(3)
July 2016(2)
June 2016(4)
May 2016 (3)
April 2016(1)
March 2016 (3)
February 2016(2)