Portugal

+351 (96) 000 6846
  • Event

    Join Scrum community members from around the world as they come together in heart of Lisbon for the 2011 Scrum Alliance Regional Gathering: Portugal. You'll find plenty of ways to participate as you share experiences, exchange information, and collaborate with fellow Scrum users. Get value and expert insight that provides you with a framework for evaluating and incorporating Scrum while you learn from experienced practitioners and leaders in the Agile community. Participate in two days of programming that includes open space, international keynote speakers, and a richly diverse lineup of events.

    Local and International Speakers, including:

    • José Ângelo Pinto (Portugal)
    • Jurgen Appelo (Netherlands)
    • Geoff Watts (United Kingdom)
    • Lasse Koskela (Finland)

    Timely Topics, ranging from

    • Kanban to Cross-Functional Teams
    • Evolutionary Design to Fixed-price Projects
    • Traditional Project Management to Full-on Scrum
    • Plus many more

    Multiple sessions to choose from, with

    • Four keynote speakers
    • 12 breakout sessions
    • Open Space

     

    Organized By

    backlog 

     Don’t miss our opening night reception

     

    Follow us on the social networks   

    Facebook  Linked In  Twitter   (please use hashtag #sgpt when tweeting about the gathering)

     

    To sponsor the event, suggest a topic, or submit a presentation, contact Mitch Lacey. To register, contact Joana Bual at +351 (96) 000 6846 or joana@backlog.pt 

  • Details

    Date: 10-11 February, 2011
    Location: Lisbon, Portugal

    Venue:
    Av. D. João II, Lt. 1.03.2.2
    Lisbon, Portugal
    Get Directions

    Regular Price:

    Scrum Alliance Certification Holder (CSx): €350 without VAT
    Standard Registration: €450 
    without VAT

     

    Portugal Scrum Gathering

  • Program

    Follow us on the social networks   

    Facebook  Linked In  Twitter   (please use tag #sgpt when twitting about the gathering)

     

        Day 1
        Room 1 Room 2
    8:45 9:30 Coffee & Snacks 
    9:30 9:45 Daily Introduction & Welcome
    9:45 10:45 Mitch Lacey: Contracts and Scrum - Making it Work
    11:00 12:15

    Agile Scales, Waterfall Doesn't

    Essential Scrum Patterns
    Vasco Duarte Ademar Aguiar
    12:15 13:45 Lunch 
    13:45 15:15 Business Agility - How to take advantage of an Agile R&D? Complexity vs. Lean: The Big Showdown
    Vasco Duarte Jurgen Appelo
    15:30 16:30 Lasse Koskela: The Omnipotent Scrum Developer
    16:30 17:00 Coffee & Snacks 
    17:00 18:15 Building Teams when moving to Large Scale Software Development The Boss Who Breaks all the Rules
    Joao Barreiro Tiago Andrade e Silva
    19:00 21:00 Drinks/Event
         

       

     

        Day 2
        Room 1 Room 2
    8:45 9:30 Coffee & Snacks 
    9:30 9:45 Daily Introduction 
    9:45 10:45 Jurgen Appelo: The Big-Ass View on Competence
    11:00 12:15 Can't Scrum, Won't Scrum Emerging Architecture: An Agile Approach for Hyper-Productive Architects
    Geoff Watts Fernando Nunes
    12:15 13:45 Lunch 
    13:45 15:15

    Scrum in the Enterprise - Turning the Oil Tanker

    Acceptance Test-Driven Development for Scrum Teams

    Paul Goddard Lasse Koskela
    15:30 16:30 José Ângelo Pinto: Fostering Teamwork Through SCRUM and PMBOK Guide
    16:30 16:45 Coffee & Snacks 
    16:45 18:00 Executive Scrum The Scrum-CMMI Method Gathering Game
    Alexandre Magno Ana Paula Valente Pereira
    18:00 18:15 Wrap Up

     

     

     

    Keynote: Evolutionary Design presented by Jim Newkirk

    How much of the design of a system changes during implementation? When these inevitable changes occur the design must evolve to meet the new requirements. If it is truly inevitable then an interesting question can be posed? Instead of spending a large amount of time upfront on the design can you put in place a series of practices to enable the design to evolve during the implementation? This session highlights the various practices of Evolutionary Design (i.e. Test-Driven Development, Refactoring, Simple Design, and Continuous.

     

    Agile Scales, Waterfall Doesn't presented by Vasco Duarte

    This talk is a tale about how, for many years, we were sold the idea that Agile does not scale when it is actually Waterfall and plan-driven are the approaches that do not scale. In this talk we will also introduce how a large company (3000+ developers) works in an agile mode even for the largest projects: 1000’s of developers in an Agile project is not Utopia, it’s business as usual at one of the largest software companies in the world


    Essential Scrum Patterns presented by Ademar Aguiar

    Teams willing to start adopting Scrum usually face many problems that must be carefully addressed, one by one, in a disciplined and informed way, especially when they are not aware of the key problems and respective best ways of solving them. Based on the existing body of literature, case studies, and lessons learned, "Essential Scrum Patterns" aims to compile the most essential best practices of Scrum in pattern form, since patterns are a very effective way of communicating expertise and best practices. In addition, it is proposed a way of organizing the overall body of literature of Scrum, where Essential Patterns act as key entry points to beginners and experts looking for more knowledge and expertise about Scrum and related disciplines.


    Business Agility: How to take advantage of an Agile R&D? presented by Vasco Duarte

    Many companies have jumped on the Agile bandwagon. That's good, but what for? In this talk we explore the consequences and possible benefits of adopting Agile for your Business. It's not enough to benefit your R&D, we need to learn how Agile can help our whole company.


    Complexity vs. Lean: The Big Showdown presented by Jurgen Appelo

    Agile software development is (in part) based on the idea that software teams are complex adaptive systems. And Lean software development is (in part) based on systems thinking. Many Agile and Lean experts have borrowed terms from complexity theory (like "self organization" and "emergence"). But what is the difference between complexity theory and systems thinking? And how does complexity thinking compare to Lean software development? Are they different, or aligned? Can we use one to better understand the other?


    Keynote: The Omnipotent Scrum Developer presented by Lasse Koskela

    The textbook Scrum Team is cross-functional, self-organizing and hyper-productive. That may sound like a high bar to set (and it is) but this challenge is something to take seriously. The software industry is slowly but steadily finding new, better ways to deliver and perform and we're not alone – the world of work is on a constant lookout for better results. In order to stay ahead of the competition or simply to stay in the game, we need to expand our attention and learning efforts outside of our personal expertise towards other disciplines such as business analysis, database optimization, interaction design, behavioral psychology, and (gasp) take a fresh look at our methods of creating software products. Building on stories about their experiences, Lasse explains how this constant pressure to transform has driven project success at Reaktor for the past few years. 
     

    Building Teams when moving to Large Scale Software Development presented by Joao Barreiro

    When Projects increase the number of Teams, new factors come into play. What factors are those and how can we build teams for this new reality?

    This presentation serves as an introduction to scaling for those new to the subject. It shows factors faced by teams and projects when the number of teams increases. Also shows possible solutions and how Agile Coaches can help the organization with the change.


    The Boss Who Breaks All the Rules presented by Tiago Andrade e Silva

    For 25 years, Ricardo Semler  has been putting into practice what increasing numbers of modern management gurus are now preaching. He heads a democratic company, Semco, where employees set their hours, determine their salaries and choose their bosses. In this session we will talk about the main management changes that Semco introduced, which are very aligned with the agile mindset. We’ll also hear from managers of five companies on their real and concrete experience in putting some of these concepts in practice.

    Invited speakers for this session: Rui Pedro Alves (Partner at Rupeal), Jurgen Appelo (Book author “Management 3.0”), João Pedro Martins (CTO at Create.IT), Alexandre Magno (Principal at AdaptWorks) and Miguel Muñoz Duarte (Partner at Imatch)

    Keynote: Contracts and Scrum: Making it Work presented by Mitch Lacey 

    It is impossible to do Scrum in a traditional project environment that requires teams to provide a fixed date of completion, a fixed budget and a fixed scope of work. Or is it? In this talk you will hear from Mitch Lacey as he describes the fallacies on our projects today, mainly how we lie to our customers and they press the “believe” button, only to realize at the end that things are not what they appear. Mr. Lacey will introduce you to two techniques that you can use with your customers to not only use Scrum but to build what they meant, not what they asked for, all while doing it for less than an traditional project.


    Can't Scrum, Won't Scrum presented by Geoff Watts

    Most organisations attempt to modify Scrum to ease the pain of transition and the proponents of Kanban market that as an "easier" path to agility than Scrum. Is Scrum actually too difficult to implement? Is the idea of "Enterprise Scrum" an impossibility? Geoff will draw on his experiences to explore whether companies can't do Scrum or, alternatively, won't do Scrum.

    Emerging Architecture: an agile approach for hyper-productive architects presented by Fernando Nunes

    A significant amount of IT projects fails on budget, time, functional requirements or customer expectations. Because complex systems do not exist in a vacuum, the reasons for those failures are many times related to systems integration conflicts, technology coupling and badly designed interactions. To anticipate all the potential issues of integration is also unrealistic, costly and time-consuming. In this session, we’ll focus on what are the important patterns to consider when using an Agile approach to Architecture, assuming that we don’t need to identify upfront every system detail but instead we’ll rely on an Emerging Architecture.

    Scrum in the Enterprise - Turning the Oil Tanker presented by Paul Goddard

    How long does it take to transform a company of 10 people to Scrum? How about 100 people? How about 10,000? This is still no blueprint for success when it comes to scaling Scrum into a large enterprise. Can it be done? Where do we start?  This session will look at examples of Scrum implementations in large organisations, talking about their successes and failures to date. Companies looking to embark on this journey need to be aware of rough seas ahead. But if you have the right crew onboard, the oil tanker will begin to turn...

    Acceptance Test-Driven Development for Scrum Teams presented by Lasse Koskela

    By now our industry has pretty much accepted the value of automated developer tests (unit tests, micro tests, module tests, and what have you) and the practice of Test-Driven Development is slowly making its way into becoming a mainstream practice of craftsman programmers for ensuring code's correctness as well as aiding in its design. Similar benefits can be delivered with Acceptance Test-Driven Development (ATDD), a test-driven approach to implementing features. Lasse will explain the dynamics of this practice and showing how it can be implemented in various ways, ranging from a simple people-centric practice to a test automation-backed engineering method.

    The Big-Ass View on Competence presented by Jurgen Appelo

    This session deals with craftsmanship and excellence. Everybody knows it is important, but few know what an organization (and management and Scrum Masters) should do to support and promote craftsmanship when projects are run by self-organizing teams. You will learn
    •    How to develop competence with 7 organizational approaches
    •    How to optimize the whole measuring performance on multiple levels
    •    How to optimize the whole measuring performance in multiple dimensions
    •    The differences between managing, coaching, and mentoring
    •    How to use social pressure and adaptive tools to support competence

    Keynote: Fostering team work through SCRUM and PMBOK Guide presented by Jose Angelo Pinto

    PMBOK guide is a standard for managing projects, applicable to any project everywhere in the world. PMBOK is composed of 42 processes and organized in 9 knowledge areas. Project life cycle is one of the most important concepts for PMBOK users and followers, since its understanding and use makes project managers life more predictable.

    SCRUM is a framework used to organize teams and get work done more productively with higher quality. It provides teams with the ability to decide the amount of work to be done and how to do it, thereby providing a more enjoyable and productive working environment.

    Are these two different concepts incompatible? How can we become SCRUM project managers and still manage the project, maintaining a vision of all the work to be done, being able to accomplish milestones and understanding cost perspectives, whilst the power of deciding is attributed to the team and whilst the quality is not controlled by the project manager?

    And how to make the team aware of the requirements relative importance, connecting their decisions, that are made according to the SCRUM framework, with the sponsor expectative and satisfying most of the stakeholders?

    These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this time frame and will be complemented with real stories from the SCRUM and PMBOK project managers.


    Executive Scrum presented by Alexandre Magno

    In the executive business world today, change is a constant, and be prepared to them is a must. This way, Scrum reveals to be an appropriate framework to be used in executive business teams once they start to work focused on ROI (Return On Investment) and in the business goals, acquire teamwork spirit, making strategy and execution nearer, improve continuously and deliver value quickly. In this work I will talk about my experience on using Scrum with senior management and how the results supported Scrum promotion for other projects inside the company.


    The Scrum-CMMI Method Gathering Game presented by Ana Paula Valente Pereira

    The latest version of the CMMI-DEV model recently released by the SEI includes specific guidance for agile environments, which denotes their recognition of the value of agile practices. However the examples provided are mixed with so many types of different processes and approaches that it is hard to see how the CMMI model can be implemented in an agile way by reading a (very boring) 500 page document.

    This session will take a ludic approach for helping agile practitioners to learn the CMMI model. Attendants will be playing a game based on Magic Gathering Cards in order to understand how to reach the CMMI goals with Scrum practices. By playing this game they will have a better understanding of the CMMI Model and how it can even be used do institutionalize Scrum at the organizational level.

     

    To register, contact Joana Bual at +351 (96) 000 6846 or jbual@netcabo.pt

  • Sponsors

    Follow us on the social networks   

    Facebook  Linked In  Twitter   (please use tag #sgpt when tweeting about the gathering)

     

     

     We would like to thank our sponsors:

     

     

     

     

    To sponsor the event, suggest a topic, or submit a presentation, contact Mitch Lacey.  To register, contact Joana Bual at +351 (96) 000 6846 or joana@backlog.pt 

  • Venue
  • Comments
    José Delgado, CSM, 2/17/2011 9:13:17 AM
    Hello
    Are the videos already available?
    Thx
    Bruno Teixeira, CSM, 2/20/2011 11:01:39 AM
    When will the presentations and videos be available?
    Thanks

    You must Login or Signup to comment.

  • Presentations

    Acceptance Test-Driven Development for Scrum Teams

    presented by Lasse Koskela

    Content Link

    Feb 11 12:45 PM to Feb 11 14:15 PM

    By now our industry has pretty much accepted the value of automated developer tests (unit tests, micro tests, module tests, and what have you) and the practice of Test-Driven Development is slowly making its way into becoming a mainstream practice of craftsman programmers for ensuring code's correctness as well as aiding in its design. Similar benefits can be delivered with Acceptance Test-Driven Development (ATDD), a test-driven approach to implementing features. Lasse will explain the dynamics of this practice and showing how it can be implemented in various ways, ranging from a simple people-centric practice to a test automation-backed engineering method.

    Agile Scales, Waterfall Doesn't

    presented by Vasco Duarte

    Feb 10 10:00 AM to Feb 10 11:15 AM

    This talk is a tale about how, for many years, we were sold the idea that Agile does not scale when it is actually Waterfall and plan-driven are the approaches that do not scale. In this talk we will also introduce how a large company (3000+ developers) works in an agile mode even for the largest projects: 1000’s of developers in an Agile project is not Utopia, it’s business as usual at one of the largest software companies in the world

    Building Teams when moving to Large Scale Software Development

    presented by Joao Barreiro

    Content Link

    Feb 10 16:00 PM to Feb 10 17:15 PM

    When Projects increase the number of Teams, new factors come into play. What factors are those and how can we build teams for this new reality?

    This presentation serves as an introduction to scaling for those new to the subject. It shows factors faced by teams and projects when the number of teams increases. Also shows possible solutions and how Agile Coaches can help the organization with the change.

    Business Agility - How to take advantage of an Agile R&D?

    presented by Vasco Duarte

    Feb 10 12:45 PM to Feb 10 14:15 PM

    Many companies have jumped on the Agile bandwagon. That's good, but what for? In this talk we explore the consequences and possible benefits of adopting Agile for your Business. It's not enough to benefit your R&D, we need to learn how Agile can help our whole company.

    Can't Scrum, Won't Scrum

    presented by Geoff Watts

    Feb 11 10:00 AM to Feb 11 11:15 AM

    Most organisations attempt to modify Scrum to ease the pain of transition and the proponents of Kanban market that as an "easier" path to agility than Scrum. Is Scrum actually too difficult to implement? Is the idea of "Enterprise Scrum" an impossibility? Geoff will draw on his experiences to explore whether companies can't do Scrum or, alternatively, won't do Scrum.

    Complexity vs. Lean: The Big Showdown

    presented by Jurgen Appelo

    Feb 10 12:45 PM to Feb 10 14:15 PM

    Agile software development is (in part) based on the idea that software teams are complex adaptive systems. And Lean software development is (in part) based on systems thinking. Many Agile and Lean experts have borrowed terms from complexity theory (like "self organization" and "emergence"). But what is the difference between complexity theory and systems thinking? And how does complexity thinking compare to Lean software development? Are they different, or aligned? Can we use one to better understand the other?

    Contracts and Scrum - Making it Work

    presented by Mitch Lacey

    Feb 10 8:45 AM to Feb 10 9:45 AM

    It is impossible to do Scrum in a traditional project environment that requires teams to provide a fixed date of completion, a fixed budget and a fixed scope of work. Or is it? In this talk you will hear from Mitch Lacey as he describes the fallacies on our projects today, mainly how we lie to our customers and they press the “believe” button, only to realize at the end that things are not what they appear. Mr. Lacey will introduce you to two techniques that you can use with your customers to not only use Scrum but to build what they meant, not what they asked for, all while doing it for less than an traditional project.

    Emerging Architecture: An Agile Approach for Hyper-Productive Architects

    presented by Fernando Nunes

    Feb 11 10:00 AM to Feb 11 11:15 AM

    A significant amount of IT projects fails on budget, time, functional requirements or customer expectations. Because complex systems do not exist in a vacuum, the reasons for those failures are many times related to systems integration conflicts, technology coupling and badly designed interactions. To anticipate all the potential issues of integration is also unrealistic, costly and time-consuming. In this session, we’ll focus on what are the important patterns to consider when using an Agile approach to Architecture, assuming that we don’t need to identify upfront every system detail but instead we’ll rely on an Emerging Architecture.

    Essential Scrum Patterns

    presented by Ademar Aguiar

    Feb 10 10:00 AM to Feb 10 11:15 AM

    Teams willing to start adopting Scrum usually face many problems that must be carefully addressed, one by one, in a disciplined and informed way, especially when they are not aware of the key problems and respective best ways of solving them. Based on the existing body of literature, case studies, and lessons learned, "Essential Scrum Patterns" aims to compile the most essential best practices of Scrum in pattern form, since patterns are a very effective way of communicating expertise and best practices. In addition, it is proposed a way of organizing the overall body of literature of Scrum, where Essential Patterns act as key entry points to beginners and experts looking for more knowledge and expertise about Scrum and related disciplines.

    Evolutionary Design

    presented by Jim Newkirk

    Feb 9 23:00 PM to Feb 9 23:00 PM

    How much of the design of a system changes during implementation? When these inevitable changes occur the design must evolve to meet the new requirements. If it is truly inevitable then an interesting question can be posed? Instead of spending a large amount of time upfront on the design can you put in place a series of practices to enable the design to evolve during the implementation? This session highlights the various practices of Evolutionary Design (i.e. Test-Driven Development, Refactoring, Simple Design, and Continuous.

    Executive Scrum

    presented by Alexandre Magno

    Feb 11 15:45 PM to Feb 11 17:00 PM

    In the executive business world today, change is a constant, and be prepared to them is a must. This way, Scrum reveals to be an appropriate framework to be used in executive business teams once they start to work focused on ROI (Return On Investment) and in the business goals, acquire teamwork spirit, making strategy and execution nearer, improve continuously and deliver value quickly. In this work I will talk about my experience on using Scrum with senior management and how the results supported Scrum promotion for other projects inside the company.

    Fostering Teamwork Through SCRUM and PMBOK Guide

    presented by José Ângelo Pinto

    Feb 11 14:30 PM to Feb 11 15:30 PM

    PMBOK guide is a standard for managing projects, applicable to any project everywhere in the world. PMBOK is composed of 42 processes and organized in 9 knowledge areas. Project life cycle is one of the most important concepts for PMBOK users and followers, since its understanding and use makes project managers life more predictable.

    SCRUM is a framework used to organize teams and get work done more productively with higher quality. It provides teams with the ability to decide the amount of work to be done and how to do it, thereby providing a more enjoyable and productive working environment.

    Are these two different concepts incompatible? How can we become SCRUM project managers and still manage the project, maintaining a vision of all the work to be done, being able to accomplish milestones and understanding cost perspectives, whilst the power of deciding is attributed to the team and whilst the quality is not controlled by the project manager?

    And how to make the team aware of the requirements relative importance, connecting their decisions, that are made according to the SCRUM framework, with the sponsor expectative and satisfying most of the stakeholders?

    These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this time frame and will be complemented with real stories from the SCRUM and PMBOK project managers.

    Keynote: The Omnipotent Scrum Developer

    presented by Lasse Koskela

    Feb 10 14:30 PM to Feb 10 15:30 PM

    The textbook Scrum Team is cross-functional, self-organizing and hyper-productive. That may sound like a high bar to set (and it is) but this challenge is something to take seriously. The software industry is slowly but steadily finding new, better ways to deliver and perform and we're not alone – the world of work is on a constant lookout for better results. In order to stay ahead of the competition or simply to stay in the game, we need to expand our attention and learning efforts outside of our personal expertise towards other disciplines such as business analysis, database optimization, interaction design, behavioral psychology, and (gasp) take a fresh look at our methods of creating software products. Building on stories about their experiences, Lasse explains how this constant pressure to transform has driven project success at Reaktor for the past few years. 
     

    Scrum in the Enterprise - Turning the Oil Tanker

    presented by Paul Goddard

    Content Link

    Feb 11 12:45 PM to Feb 11 14:15 PM

    How long does it take to transform a company of 10 people to Scrum? How about 100 people? How about 10,000? This is still no blueprint for success when it comes to scaling Scrum into a large enterprise. Can it be done? Where do we start?  This session will look at examples of Scrum implementations in large organisations, talking about their successes and failures to date. Companies looking to embark on this journey need to be aware of rough seas ahead. But if you have the right crew onboard, the oil tanker will begin to turn...

    The Big-Ass View on Competence

    presented by Jurgen Appelo

    Content Link

    Feb 11 8:45 AM to Feb 11 9:45 AM

    This session deals with craftsmanship and excellence. Everybody knows it is important, but few know what an organization (and management and Scrum Masters) should do to support and promote craftsmanship when projects are run by self-organizing teams. You will learn
    •    How to develop competence with 7 organizational approaches
    •    How to optimize the whole measuring performance on multiple levels
    •    How to optimize the whole measuring performance in multiple dimensions
    •    The differences between managing, coaching, and mentoring
    •    How to use social pressure and adaptive tools to support competence

    The Boss Who Breaks all the Rules

    presented by Tiago Andrade e Silva

    Feb 10 16:00 PM to Feb 10 17:15 PM

    For 25 years, Ricardo Semler  has been putting into practice what increasing numbers of modern management gurus are now preaching. He heads a democratic company, Semco, where employees set their hours, determine their salaries and choose their bosses. In this session we will talk about the main management changes that Semco introduced, which are very aligned with the agile mindset. We’ll also hear from managers of five companies on their real and concrete experience in putting some of these concepts in practice.

    Invited speakers for this session: Rui Pedro Alves (Partner at Rupeal), Jurgen Appelo (Book author “Management 3.0”), João Pedro Martins (CTO at Create.IT), Alexandre Magno (Principal at AdaptWorks) and Miguel Muñoz Duarte (Partner at Imatch)

    The Scrum-CMMI Method Gathering Game

    presented by Ana Paula Valente Pereira

    Feb 11 15:45 PM to Feb 11 17:00 PM

    The latest version of the CMMI-DEV model recently released by the SEI includes specific guidance for agile environments, which denotes their recognition of the value of agile practices. However the examples provided are mixed with so many types of different processes and approaches that it is hard to see how the CMMI model can be implemented in an agile way by reading a (very boring) 500 page document.

    This session will take a ludic approach for helping agile practitioners to learn the CMMI model. Attendants will be playing a game based on Magic Gathering Cards in order to understand how to reach the CMMI goals with Scrum practices. By playing this game they will have a better understanding of the CMMI Model and how it can even be used do institutionalize Scrum at the organizational level.

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0 non-members