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Enjoy our extensive collection of member-contributed articles to learn how other Scrum practitioners use Scrum in the workplace.

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5 Common Mistakes We Make Writing User Stories

5 Common Mistakes We Make Writing User Stories

Most of the issues with gathering requirements in agile software development and agile testing derive from issues with User Stories. Somehow expressing requirements in such a simple form causes a lot of trouble to agile teams. Of course art of writing good User Stories is the most difficult for new teams starting with a new agile project or these, which freshly transformed development methods to agile software development methodologies. Mistakes made at that point lead to wrong Test Cases, wrong understanding of requirements, and the worst of all wrong implementation which can be direct cause of rejecting the deliverables of the iteration. Lets take a look at the five most common mistakes people make writing User Stories.

It's Ordered -- Not Prioritized!

It's Ordered -- Not Prioritized!

In the past, the Scrum Guide consistently used the word "priority" for the Product Backlog or noted that the Product Backlog was “prioritized.” While the Product Backlog must be ordered, prioritization is only one technique — and rarely a good one at that. The new Scrum Guide instead uses the term ordered for the Product Backlog. This reflects long-held understanding by many leaders in the Scrum community. Let’s clarify the reason for the change.——

Transitioning From Time-Based to Relative Estimation

Transitioning From Time-Based to Relative Estimation

Congratulations! You’ve finally convinced the team that relative story point estimation is a great way to move forward and you’re now ready to jump into your first planning poker session.  So where do you start? What’s a 1-point story? What’s a 3-point story? What’s a 13-point story? Your team is looking to you and this process is almost as new to you as it is to them.

Agile Project Dashboards

Agile Project Dashboards

“Scrum is all about delighting customers and delivering value to stakeholders.” I have read this kind of statement since my first day working with Scrum in 2007. Even more, I’ve had the privilege of taking part on Scrum teams th...

Compasses, Trees, and Pains

Compasses, Trees, and Pains

I have heard, read, and had nightmares starring the same old question time and again: “Am I doing Scrum or not?” Generally speaking, coaches, trainers and old-timers have a very blunt and clear answer for that: “If you are follow...

Dancing with Pigs

Dancing with Pigs

Dancing with Pigs [1] There are many ways to choreograph the activities within a sprint, but all of them involve intricate, dance like, interactions among testers [2], product owners, other team members and stakeholders. Becoming good at agile de...

The Best of the Seattle Scrum Gathering

The Best of the Seattle Scrum Gathering

Event Overview In the photos: (1) Chet Hendrickson and Ron Jeffries addressed the attendants during lunch; (2) Open Space session; (3) The Scrum Trainers Michael James and Nigel Baker. Scrum Global Gathering: Seattle 2011 was held from 16 to 1...

Scrum Global Gathering: London 2011: Call for Papers Now Open

Scrum Global Gathering: London 2011: Call for Papers Now Open

Submit your presentation proposal now!

Daily Stand-up, Beyond Mechanics: A Measure of Self-Organization

Daily Stand-up, Beyond Mechanics: A Measure of Self-Organization

The daily stand-up is a 15-minute meeting for Scrum teams. It provides an opportunity to touch base on progress toward daily commitments and sprint goals. The ScrumMaster, product owner, and all team members participate in this daily meeting. To k...

The Short Short Story

The Short Short Story

The short short story: How long does it have to be? Scrum teams often use user stories for backlog items. Unfortunately, one of the most important aspects of a story—its extremely short length—has been subtly transformed over time, an...

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