Articles published in 2012

Key Arguments to Sell Scrum to Your Boss

Key Arguments to Sell Scrum to Your Boss

 Why should your boss let you implement Scrum in your organization? Things are already working, and they get their results.Well, one thing that I've noticed is always hard on the development side is to quickly respond to changes. The marketers, business, sales, and production staff usually need things to be done now, because, well, now is now and tomorrow is tomorrow.

How to and Not to Introduce an Agile Delivery Methodology Within an Organization

How to and Not to Introduce an Agile Delivery Methodology Within an Organization

The process organization at one of the largest global automobile giants delivers several hundred projects and manages several system change-and-upgrade activities, in addition to maintaining IT operations. The project delivery methodology employed...

When Do You Call Scrum "Scrum"?

When Do You Call Scrum "Scrum"?

As we all know, Agile and Scrum have become popular, and many development and maintenance projects are adopting Scrum to reap its benefits. In my organization, where we deal with multiple clients across different geographies with different organiz...

Less Is More: Why a 50% Solution Hit the Sweet Spot

Less Is More: Why a 50% Solution Hit the Sweet Spot

When feedback from your customer includes enthusiastic comments like, "This is what we've wanted for years," and your project sponsor says, "One of the greatest projects in my career!" then you know you've done something right. When this applies to a project that was at a dead end, without much trust from stakeholders and little money left only a year earlier, such results are even more surprising.

Your Client Isn't Your Product Owner

Your Client Isn't Your Product Owner

Sometimes, when an organization is adopting Scrum as its development model, the following unfortunate thing happens: A decision maker with authority over the team-to-be is trying to match existing people to each of the Scrum roles, and he or she thinks, "Product owner . . . well, that's obviously the customer."Wrong. In almost every case.

Golf and Scrum

Golf and Scrum

People say that you play golf to relax, and that to play golf you need to be relaxed. To be Agile you need to be professional, and to be professional you need be Agile.

Effectiveness of Group Code Review in a Scrum Environment

Effectiveness of Group Code Review in a Scrum Environment

The most ignored attribute of development is reviews. Many Scrum teams compromise on review tasks in order to complete their other tasks in a particular sprint. Though they plan separate tasks for reviews, they frequently ignore them. In reviews themselves, the most ignored is the code review. The shorter the sprint, the less the importance and time allocated to code reviews.I think it should be the other way around. 

Culture Shock

Culture Shock

Each Agile team creates its own culture. Moving between teams, and specifically Agile teams, is not only about different work or different team members to work with; it's mainly about adapting to different team cultures.Team culture takes time to evolve and — like any other type of culture — it will resist a change, no matter how small it is. That change can be in the form of new person (like you), or it can be in the form of new idea that you want to implement.

Give Life to Your Product Backlog

Give Life to Your Product Backlog

 A common perception when working in Agile is, "Welcome changes over following a plan." In the Agile Manifesto, however, the phrases "Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage" still mean you need a plan to begin with.How can we express the product backlog so that we can easily provide enough planning information to management without compromising on Agile principles?

PMPs versus Agile Project Managers: Clash of the Titans

PMPs versus Agile Project Managers: Clash of the Titans

To the foreign eye, a PMP is in one corner, and in the opposite corner we have an Agile project manager. This seems to be so because each advocates a different vision of how to run a project, and even a different conception about what a project really is. The PMBok Guide has been the source for years in project management, but in the last decade Agile has gained more popularity and now seems ready to challenge the champion for the belt.But is it really true that this two are opposed, or it would be possible to find common ground? Don't miss this fight, which doesn't promise knockouts but instead may go the distance.

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