Articles published in August 2011

5 Common Mistakes We Make Writing User Stories

5 Common Mistakes We Make Writing User Stories

Most of the issues with gathering requirements in agile software development and agile testing derive from issues with User Stories. Somehow expressing requirements in such a simple form causes a lot of trouble to agile teams. Of course art of writing good User Stories is the most difficult for new teams starting with a new agile project or these, which freshly transformed development methods to agile software development methodologies. Mistakes made at that point lead to wrong Test Cases, wrong understanding of requirements, and the worst of all wrong implementation which can be direct cause of rejecting the deliverables of the iteration. Lets take a look at the five most common mistakes people make writing User Stories.

It's Ordered -- Not Prioritized!

It's Ordered -- Not Prioritized!

In the past, the Scrum Guide consistently used the word "priority" for the Product Backlog or noted that the Product Backlog was “prioritized.” While the Product Backlog must be ordered, prioritization is only one technique — and rarely a good one at that. The new Scrum Guide instead uses the term ordered for the Product Backlog. This reflects long-held understanding by many leaders in the Scrum community. Let’s clarify the reason for the change.——

Transitioning From Time-Based to Relative Estimation

Transitioning From Time-Based to Relative Estimation

Congratulations! You’ve finally convinced the team that relative story point estimation is a great way to move forward and you’re now ready to jump into your first planning poker session.  So where do you start? What’s a 1-point story? What’s a 3-point story? What’s a 13-point story? Your team is looking to you and this process is almost as new to you as it is to them.